Lag BaOmer

Lag BaOmer is a Jewish Festival celebrated on the 33rd day of the Counting of the Omer that occurs on the 18th day of the Hebrew month of Iyar. This day marks the Hil Lula celebration that deciphered by some anniversary of the death of Rabbi Shimon bar Yochai, a Mishnaic sage and managing disciple of Rabbi Akiva in the 2nd century, and the day in which he exhibited the deepest secrets of Kabbalah in the form of the Zohar. It is a Book of Splendor, a landmark text of Jewish mysticism. An association like this has spawned many popular customs and practices on Lag BaOmer including the lighting of bonfires, wayfarings to the tomb of Bar Yochai in the northern Israeli town of Meron, and several customs at the tomb itself.

“And from the day on which you bring the offering…you shall count off seven weeks. They must be complete.” This commandment led to the practice of the Sefirat Ha’omer, or the 49 days of the “Counting of the Omer,” which begins on the second day of Passover and ends on Shavuot. Lag BaOmer is a shorthand way of saying “the 33rd day of the Omer”.- The Book of Leviticus

Lag BaOmer
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google+
  • Pinterest
  • Gmail
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon

Lag BaOmer

History of Lag BaOmer

The date is specified explicitly in the 13th century for the first time by the Talmudist Meiri in his gleam to Yevamot 62b. The Talmudic journey states that during the time of Rabbi Akiva, 24,000 of his students died from a divinely-sent epidemic during the counting of the Omer. Lag BaOmer is not stated in the Torah and only mentioned at in the Talmud. Consequently, there is no formal observance joined with the holiday. Moderately a series of engaging and significant Lag BaOmer celebrations have evolved over time. Lag BaOmer is a shorthand way of saying the 33rd day of the Omer. In joining to tracking the agricultural cycle, the Omer marks the period from Passover, which memorializes our people’s emigration from Egypt to Shavuot, which admires the giving of the Torah at Mount Sinai.

Lag BaOmer
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google+
  • Pinterest
  • Gmail
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon

Lag BaOmer

The journey from Egypt to Sinai was not only biblical but religious as well. As the Israelites advanced through the desert, they also had to find their way through the wastelands of their souls by preparing themselves not only to be given the Torah but to admit the Torah. Historically, the period of the Omer is a time of semi-mourning, when weddings and festivities are avoided, in memory of a plague that killed thousands of students of Rabbi Akiva, a Talmudic scholar. Lag BaOmer was the day on which the plague ceased which became a day on which the mourning rituals abandoned.

How to Celebrate the Lag BaOmer

Celebrate the Lag BaOmer with the Live Music by Israeli sensation Ninet Tayeb. Also, by playing the free Games, Sports, Archery. Arts and Crafts also included. Bonfires which bring a blanket. Enjoy with Kosher BBQ Dinner by Oakland Kosher Foods also veggie option are available.

Lag BaOmer
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google+
  • Pinterest
  • Gmail
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon

Lag BaOmer

Bingo Game that enters to win an Apple iPad.  There are not several traditional foods, but in Israel, common foods are eaten on holiday introduce kebabs roasted skewered meat and vegetables too like pitas, potato salad, tahini, etc. Any foods to go well at a picnic and bonfire are great options for Lag B’Omer.

Thank you for reading the post “Lag BaOmer.” Celebrate other festivals with Happydays-365.com.

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This